Although it may take a lot of willpower to overcome your sweet tooth, there’s one thing you can do to put all your sugary cravings to a halt–and that’s to get enough sleep.

According to a study from the University of California Berkeley, people who are lacking in the sleep department are more likely to crave for sweets and high-calorie foods. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley professor of psychology and neuroscience and senior author of the study says, "What we have discovered is that high-level brain regions required for complex judgments and decisions become blunted by a lack of sleep, while more primal brain structures that control motivation and desire are amplified."

This only means that your desire for rewards increases, while your ability to make sound decisions decreases when you don't have enough sleep. Yikes!

Stephanie Greer, a doctoral student in Walker’s Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory and lead author of the paper, also adds that when your brain is impaired due to lack of sleep,you tend to make more unhealthy food choices.

If you’re planning to lose weight this New Year, hit the sack early and get a good night's sleep.

PHOTO: Pixabay

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