If you’re the type to worry about whether or not your calorie intake comes from a high-protein or low-protein source, then you may be wasting your time. According to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, where you get your calories doesn’t really matter. You’ll still gain pretty much the same amount of fat from it. Weight, though, is another matter altogether.

For the study, researchers led by Dr. George Bray from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, invited 25 young and healthy volunteers to live temporarily in their lab with a prescribed diet. For the first few weeks, researchers tried to gauge how many calories it would take for the participants to maintain their weight. In the eight weeks that followed, they then added 1,000 more calories to the diet. One-third of the volunteers had had 15 percent of their calories sourced from protein, while the others had had 25 and 5 percent of their calories sourced from both high-protein and low-protein foods respectively.

Results revealed that while all of the participants gained weight, they did it at varying levels. Some gained body fat but lost muscle. Others packed on both the body fat and lean muscle. Either way, everyone gained a more or less similar amount of body fat.

If you thought that eating calories from a low-protein source could help you get in better shape, then a change of plans is in order. Find ways to refine your diet even more; start counting calories. After all, even when you feel like you've lost weight, you might have only just lost muscle. When that happens, you need to take a step back because losing body protein is not good for your health.


If you want to lose weight but want to do it safely, check out these articles for ideas:

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(Photo by Another Pint Please... via Flickr Creative Commons)

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