Too much salt can lead to high blood pressure which, in turn, can lead to heart disease. Unfortunately, many of us don’t realize just how much salt we consume in a day. According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), for example, 9 out of 10 Americans are over the recommended limit. The food responsible for the sodium overdose? Bread!

To be fair, a single slice of bread isn’t exactly the harbinger of doom. While one slice does pack as much as 230 milligrams, it would take more than a few slices every day for high blood pressure to catch up with us. Unfortunately, therein lies the problem. Even though we may consume less bread than, say, the average American, too many people eat bread for breakfast and bring a sandwich to work. Considering how often we eat bread, CDC’s report does have terrifying implications. According to CDC Director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, "Heart disease and stroke are leading causes of death in the United States and are largely dependent on the high rate of high blood pressure."

In the US, Americans consume about 3,266 mg of salt each day—more than the 2,300 mg recommended by CDC. A good percentage of that salt came from grocery stores and restaurant selections. The same could be said for our own local supermarkets.

With this new knowledge, we should make an effort to lower our sodium intake. Eating fruits and vegetables is a good way to start. While shopping for groceries, it’s also important that we look for items that have the lowest salt content.


Start eating healthy today! Check out these articles for tips:


(Photo by mvcaf via Flickr Creative Commons)

Get the latest updates from Female Network
Subscribe to our Newsletter!
Comments

Latest Stories

Christian Bautista and Kat Ramnani Share Why It's Important To Discuss Finances Before Getting Married

Kat Ramnani and Christian Bautista encourage engaged couples to discuss their financial arrangements even before their wedding.

Sitti on Having Emergency CS: "It was timely and right"

The bossa nova singer, who has PCOS and APAS, said she felt her daughter wanted to come sooner.
Load More Stories