grad_breakup_main.jpgGraduation brings about change, whether you’re graduating with a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, or a PhD. Classes are traded in for jobs, and the hallowed halls of your alma mater are traded in for the bustling streets and commuter stations and the sterile (or maybe even drab) corridors of your new office building.

Even if you’re staying in the academic world—making the transition from teacher to student, for example—things are bound to change. And a major life change like this one is bound to bring about other changes. Sadly, for some of us, the “In a Relationship” status on our social networking profiles may be one of the first things to require editing.

Post-graduation breakups are not rare. We’ve heard stories and watched movies about them. Uncertainties, new challenges, time constraints, and job demands brought about by employment (or unemployment) are far cry from those we encountered in school. Then there’s the income level. If you earn more than your man—a distinct possibility if your degree is higher than his—he might be insecure about it, and it could give rise to fights. You two may have had the same maturity level back when you were studying, but not everyone can adjust quickly to the new dynamics the aftermath of graduation brings.

So how do you avoid breaking up amid all the change going on?

KEEP IN CONTACT
Instant messengers (if it’s not blocked), SMS, and email all help you coordinate your plans for the night and fend off the dreaded sudden schedule changes.

BE UNDERSTANDING
Work brings stress. So if he snaps back, try and give him the benefit of the doubt—we all have our bad days. But remember that he should also show you the same courtesy.

INJECT LIFE INTO YOUR RELATIONSHIP
This Female Network article offers tips on how to keep the relationship going strong and to keep things fresh and enjoyable.


Despite all the effort you may put into your relationship, though, it sometimes just can’t be helped if your relationship doesn’t grow to accommodate the new elements in your life. You get assigned abroad, he gets the night shift. You delay replying to his text because you’re rushing something. He forgets you have a date because of his presentation the next day. Things fall apart. Whether it was a good or bad break-up, it’ll affect you, especially if your whole relationship up to this point has been lived in your pre-graduation mode.

It’s not the end of the world, though. Not when there are a lot of things you can now do! Here are a few suggestions.

APPLY YOURSELF TO YOUR WORK
A good way to recover is to keep yourself busy. Who knows? Uou might just get that promotion a few months earlier than scheduled!

MAKE NEW FRIENDS AT WORK
Since you don’t have regular Friday night plans anymore, might as well hang out with your office mates for karaoke night bonding!

RECONNECT WITH OLD FRIENDS
Schedule a weekend to meet up over coffee and catch up with the friends you may not always have had time to see when you were in a relationship!

RETAIL THERAPY
You’re earning money (or more money than you were before graduation), and you don’t have anyone to spend it on so why not spend it on yourself?

TRAVEL
Breakup and work-related stress can really burn you out. This is your chance to go to that place you’ve always wanted to visit and see new sights and experience new things!


Breaking up is never easy, so watch for the warning signs. If it happens, realize that it’s not a door closing but one that opens to new opportunities for you!


(Photo source: sxc.hu)

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