If you've experienced migraines before, you might want to start taking a look at how they affect your mood. A new study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 64th Annual Meeting in New Orleans suggests that migraines can now be linked to depression. Women who have experienced migraines in the past may have an increased chance of developing depression in the future.

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The data was taken from 36,154 women who were part of a larger Women’s Health Study. Some of the questions the women answered included ones on whether or not they had experienced migraines, what kind they were, and whether they were experiencing any symptoms of depression. Upon analysis, researchers were able to count 6,456 women who had current or past migraine episodes. Through a 14-year follow-up, researchers discovered that 3,971 of these women had fallen into depression.

As one of the largest studies done on migraines and depression, the research has certainly made a difference in the field of medicine. Researchers hope that medical experts who deal with migraines can help prepare their patients for the possibility of depression or advise them on how to avoid falling into it in the first place.


For more on depression, check these out on FN:


(Photo by SashaW via Flickr Creative Commons)

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