baron_geisler.jpgBaron Geisler made waves last week after the Professional Artists Management, Inc. (PAMI) and actress Cherry Pie Picache filed a harassment complaint against him, ABS-CBNNews.com reports. The protest came after he allegedly touched Cherry Pie’s breasts during the filming of the TV series Noah. As a result, he was removed from the series and banned from working with PAMI artists.

Baron has apologized for his behavior, admitting he got drunk before the taping after learning that he had been eliminated from the cast of a prestigious film he’d been auditioning for. He is set to enter a 90-day rehabilitation program for alcoholism this week, reports PEP.ph. Baron actually started treatment last year, but had to stop because of his busy schedule.

When asked about the origin of his drinking problem, he revealed in an interview on ANC that he became a heavy drinker after his breakup with actress Jodi Sta. Maria. “She is one of the reasons why I became a bit crazy," he is quoted as saying of his fellow Noah cast member. " Let's just put it this way: she is the one that got away....not in the sense na serial killer ako. She's the one that got away.”

Do you have any loved ones who might be struggling with alcoholism? Before you make a move or cast judgment, arm yourself with these five fast facts on alcoholism.


1.    ALCOHOLISM IS A DISEASE.

While non-alcoholics may think that giving up alcohol is just a question of having enough willpower to do so, the truth is that alcoholism is a disease, and it’s not one that’s exclusive to party girls or celebritiesAccording to MedicineNet.com, alcoholics need alcohol as much as they do food and water. This means they can no longer control their urge to drink, much as they might want to. Even recognizing the negative impact their addiction has on their lives may not be sufficient for curbing their alcoholic tendencies.


2. EMOTIONAL TRAUMA IS NOT THE CAUSE OF ALCOHOLISM.

“Although emotional trauma can trigger drinking,” Malyn Cristobal, family therapist and founder of the Living Free Foundation says, “it cannot be blamed as the cause of alcoholism. Some people experience heartache, loss, and grief, but they do not become alcoholics.” Instead, alcoholism depends on several risk factors, as MayoClinic.com notes. Being a regular drinker, for example, can eventually lead to physical dependence on alcohol. Alcoholism can also depend on social and cultural factors, lifestyle, age, and sex.


3.    FAMILY HISTORY INCREASES THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALCOHOLISM.

Research shows that a family history of alcoholism does increase your risk of developing the disease, reports MedicineNet.com. Just because it runs in the family, however, it doesn’t mean your child will automatically become an alcoholic. Cristobal stresses the importance of communicating with your loved ones as a way of preventing them from turning to alcohol, drugs, or any kind of substance abuse for relief. “Most often, any type of addiction is used to numb or fix [feelings],” she explains. “Most of us do not have healthy coping skills or we were not taught how.”


4. ALCOHOLICS BECOME DIFFERENT PEOPLE WHEN THEY DRINK.

Acknowledge that an alcoholic becomes a different person when he drinks. This means what he does when he’s inebriated is no longer an accurate reflection of himself. Although this does not excuse his bad behavior, knowing this is instrumental to understanding where he’s coming from. “Alcoholics are not bad people,” Cristobal notes. “They need help. They resort to maladaptive behavior due to the alcohol. The alcohol takes control.”


5.    ALCOHOLISM IS TREATABLE.

“[A]nyone who has a problem with alcohol or any mood-altering chemicals needs to be treated, not punished,” Cristobal says. She stresses that treatment for addiction does work, which is why getting your affected loved one help through rehabilitation is really the best course of action. “In treatment, you identify the maladaptive behavior, face the consequences of your behavior, work on making amends to yourself and others as well learn tools to stay clean and sober.”


Need help? Dial the Alcoholics Anonymous Hotline at 890-2247. Have further questions about helping your loved ones who are alcoholics? Email the Living Free Foundation at livingfreefoundation98@gmail.com.


Do you have a friend or family member who is an alcoholic? Read this article for tips on coping with his or her condition:
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(Photo courtesy of PEP.ph)

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