stage_mom_inside.jpgTV5’s Willing Willie has been raking in viewers since its charismatic host, Willie Revillame, made his TV comeback. Now, the said primetime show is at the center of controversy due to its the March 12 episode, which featured a “gyrating 6-year old boy.” Along with the attention comes varying points of view ranging from disgust to support. Earlier this week, we asked you whether you thought having six-year-old Jan-Jan perform a sexy dance onscreen even though he was crying, and many of you either placed much of the responsibility on the boy’s parents or said that once he started crying, the adults should have told him he could stop.

The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) took particular notice of the incident the incident. A report from PEP.ph quotes a statement from the CHR which said, “The Commission on Human Rights strongly condemns the Willing Willie episode aired on March 12, 2011 wherein a 6-year old boy named Jan-Jan Suan performed a 'macho-dancing routine.' This is an exploitation of the child's innocence and demeans his inherent dignity for entertainment's sake.”

Tongues are wagging and fingers pointing, and many do agree that the parents are at least partially responsible for the issue. Is it a simple case of stage parent overdrive? While that remains to be seen, we cannot help but wonder whether the same question is hitting close to home.  After all, there’s a fine line between being a proud parent and, as The Washington Times puts it, a “deranged stage mom.” Here are five questions to ask yourself before you make your child perform:


1. ARE YOU SURE YOUR CHILD REALLY WANTS THIS?

Summer activities are good and all, but if your six-year-old daughter isn’t showing the least bit interest in acting workshops or ballet lessons, then it’s best not to push her.  Try to talk to your child first before enrolling her in any extracurricular activities. Go through all the possible options available, and have your child choose which one she or he is most interested in. It’s important that you don’t make your child attend workshops or classes because you want him/her to. If she/he feels forced, it can stunt whatever potential she/he might have.


2. ARE REHEARSALS/PRACTICE CUTTING INTO OTHER ACTIVITIES?

While keeping your kids occupied during the summer vacation might keep them from bouncing off the walls from boredom, it’s not advisable to overload their schedule with too many activities. If, for example, your daughter’s summer is loaded with classes and other planned activities, it leaves her very little room to play and have fun with the friends she has in your neighborhood. Extracurricular activities help hone your child’s talent, but these skills are worth nothing if they aren’t balanced by social skills which are learned through play and social interactions.  Also factor fun and rest time—you want your child to come off the summer break recharged and ready to face the new school year instead of stressed or tired from all his or her extracurriculars.


3. ARE YOUR CHILD’S ONLY FRIENDS THE KIDS IN HIS/HER WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES?

You want your child to grow up to be well-rounded and able to cope with people from various walks of life. But if the only people your daughter considers friends who are close to her own age are the kids she meets through sports clinics, dance classes, and piano recitals, then you should consider widening her social circles. Classes that develop your child’s talents can help her focus and instill a sense of discipline, but if this is the only environment she is exposed to, she may lose the appreciation for the things that make childhood fun. 


4. DO YOU FEEL YOU’RE BEING TOO COMPETITIVE?

Another thing about being in a summer workshop with friends is that, sometimes, a little “healthy competition” might end up going too far. Competition is all right as long as it’s good, clean fun. But if you take it to toddler beauty queen level, then your child might be feel too pressured to win to actually enjoy the activity. It’s great that you want to be the best mom you can be, but this won’t happen if you do this at your child’s expense. Constantly pushing for competition might lead to unhealthy views on winning and losing, and your child might end up feeling like she has to do something big to deserve your love. Think of it this way: you child isn’t necessarily competing with the other kids, and you aren’t necessarily competing with other moms—instead, you’re trying to get the best out of a fun learning activity that may turn out to be character-building as well.


5. IS YOUR CHILD HAPPY WITH WHAT SHE/HE IS DOING?

Be on the lookout for signs that say your child doesn’t enjoy what she’s doing anymore. There are cases where kids might not like performing at first, but might eventually find themselves warming up to the stage. But before you pull the late bloomer card as an excuse for the summer workshops and after-school piano lessons, make sure that your child likes the craft too. After all, there are kids who may love to play the piano but are not comfortable with performing in recitals, and the more you force them, the more resentful they get. Try to be more observant about your child's behavior. If she frequently comes home crying and complaining, then have a heart-to-heart talk with her. For all we know, all she needs is a more patient teacher or a different school with a program more suited to her tastes. But if she says outright that she's not interested in performing per se, then maybe it's time for a curtain call.

Read these articles for more parenting tips:
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
CONTINUE READING BELOW
Recommended Videos

(Photo by tom@hk via Flickr Creative Commons)
Get the latest updates from Female Network
Subscribe to our Newsletter!
Comments
Trending on Network

Latest Stories

Meet Alice Dixson's First Baby, Aura!

The 51-year-old actress had her first child through surrogacy in early 2021.

This Pinay Executive Shares the Career Lessons That Brought Her to the Top

AXA Philippines Chief of Commercial Business believes that women and mothers have an advantage in the workforce.
Load More Stories