Article_SharonKC_Pep.jpgThe Megastar has finally spoken up against the slew of rumors painting her eldest daughter, KC, in an unfavorable light. In a report from PEP.ph, Sharon Cuneta was less than her usual composed self and more of a protective mother when she said, "Ang iniingatan ko, ang pagkatao ng anak ko! Oo, iyon ang concern ko bilang magulang."

Apparently, the rumors saying KC was rude have reached Sharon's ears, and despite her showbiz status, she acted like any protective mother. "Medyo inaapi yung anak ko...Nagre-react ako kasi hindi lumalaban yung anak ko pag ganun, e," Sharon was quoted as saying. "Pag medyo lumampas, unahin natin yung pagka-nanay ko, hindi ko uunahin yung pagka-artista ako."

While not all of us are mothers, we've all experienced similar situations where we've heard less than flattering comments about friends or other family members. While there are comments we can brush off, there are some that should just be straightened out right then and there. But when should you step in and when should you just choose to ignore negative statements?

Here are five FN tips on when you should come to your friends' (or loved ones') defense.


1. WHEN THE RUMORS HIT BELOW THE BELT

You know what we're talking about here: rumors of being involved in anything illegal and salacious should be nipped in the bud--immediately. You don't even have to know the whole story about the rumor. If people you know are talking of things that can permanently damage a friend's reputation, ask them to stop and let them know that what they're doing isn't cool with you. Period.


2. WHEN PROFESSIONAL DISAGREEMENTS BECOME PERSONAL SQUABBLES


We've been through this ourselves: disagreements in meetings over work matters get taken as personal attacks and all of a sudden you hear hushed conversations referring to your not being a team player, or worse, that you are incompetent. Office rumors get out of hand quickly and asking colleagues to control their tendency to gossip will kill the fire before it blazes out of control.


3. WHEN THE RUMORS TOUCH ON SENSITIVE TOPICS

There are topics that just make it all too easy to gossip behind someone's back: news of a failed relationship, office talk about someone possibly losing their job--these makes for great conversation during lunch or coffee. When you find yourself in the middle of it, politely excuse yourself from the conversation. If it's about someone you know, cool down the conversation by reminding people that the person they're talking about is already tense about the situation, no reason to add more drama.


4. WHEN RUMORS PERSIST EVEN AFTER AN ISSUE HAS BEEN CLEARED UP

Sometimes, it hard to kill good gossip even after they've been cleared and done away with. They're just too juicy to resist. People talk about this more openly because they seem to think that neither of the parties involved will care anymore. The best way to deal with it? Laugh and say that your friend will love to hear how she's become so popular that she's the word on everyone's lips!


5. WHEN THE GOSSIP FORCES PEOPLE TO TAKE SIDES

Rumors like these are harder to quash because "campaigning" happens and it becomes a case of "us" vs "them." This usually happens when the issue involves two people and someone starts telling bits and pieces of the story to their friends. And like any great gossip, things snowball and pretty soon, you have an unhappy mob to contend with. Talking to a whole group of people will be hard, but if you're able to talk to a person from "the other side" calmly, rationally and remind them that this is something that the two people involved should resolve between themselves, then it's a battle half-won.


Friendship means being there to defend your friends when the going gets tough, but then again, these situations are extreme and most of the time, stepping up and telling people off won't really be needed. But let us just remind you that before you butt in, think of what you're about to do and how it'll affect your friend. If she has more of a more delicate nature and non-confrontational, then with a lot of tact on your part, it may just work. But if your friend is someone more thick-skinned, then you're probably better of mentioning it to her in an offhand manner.

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(Photo courtesy of Pep.ph)

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