It reminds you of your youth.
Reading YA books transports you back to a time when you thought varsity player Devlin was EVERYTHING or when not being allowed to join your classmate's pool party was the end of the world. Cringing yet? Still, you have to admit that it’s nice to look back and see your 15-year-old self from the point of view of someone who has been there and done that. That bit of nostalgia, according to the New York Times, "has been shown to counteract loneliness, boredom and anxiety. It makes people more generous to strangers and more tolerant of outsiders."

It reduces stress.
Some days call for John Grisham, other days call for Rainbow Rowell. When you’re feeling particularly stressed out at the office or fed up with your boyfriend/husband, guess which author would make you feel better.

It's still relatable.
YA books have changed so much over the past decades. Today, the genre has no qualms discussing the reality of poverty, loneliness, displacement, and even death alongside love, happiness, relationships, and life. Even if these books have been written for a younger audience, adults will have no problems relating to them. After all, no matter how many years it has been since you first fell in love, it doesn't change the fact that you still fall in love and you still get your heart broken. You still feel out of place, and you still have a lot to discover about yourself.


Need more YA in your life? Check out The Candy Guide to YA Everything You Need to Know about YA Lit, now available in National Book Store branches nationwide for only P175. For more updates from Candy Magazine, like CandyMag on Facebook and follow @candymagdotcom on Twitter and Instagram.

SCREENCAP: The Fault in Our Stars/20th Century Fox (2014)

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