1. Funny Girl: A Novel by Nick Hornby, P1,118
Head to Swinging London with the plucky Sophie Straw, who goes from provincial beauty queen to star of a hit ’60s sitcom. Often funny and witty but never silly and shallow, Funny Girl also introduces us to a cast of other endearing and likable characters: Sophie’s co-star, and the show’s director and writers. The snappy dialogue ("I’m not who you think I am." "I don’t think you’re anybody.") also makes you wish this novel were a real-life TV series, too. It’s another sure hit from Hornby.

(Available at Fully Booked)

2. Driving Hungry: A Memoir by Layne Mosler
Meet blogger and now memoirist Mosler. "Wherever I go, I get in a taxi, ask the [cabbie] to take me to his or her favorite place to eat and document the adventure, culinary and otherwise," she writes on her Taxi Gourmet blog. Her first book—a foodie version of Eat, Pray, Love—is "about food, wanderlust… the beauty of chance encounters..." Go on a food trip to Buenos Aires, New York City, and Berlin, where Mosler finds the cabbie who becomes her hubby.

(Available for pre-order at National Book Store)

3. Fast Food Fiction Delivery: Short Stories to Go, edited by Noelle Q. de Jesus and Mookie Katigbak-Lacuesta, P220
If you think you’re too busy to read even a short story, think again. This anthology of flash fiction has stories as short as 92 words (the longest are just a little over 500)—perfect for killing time when you’re stuck in traffic. The writers of these 68 super short stories scrimp only on the word count, not literary merit. Sure beats those two-sentence horror stories found online.

(Available at National Book Store)

4. The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain, P629
Let a character in this charming French novel give you the lowdown: "It’s the story of a bookseller who finds a handbag in the street one day, takes it home with him, empties out its contents (including the red notebook—a diary of sorts), and decides to look for the woman who owns it…" If walking the streets of Paris is on your bucket list, whether solo or with a beau, read this book as you sip a latte in a café—and daydream about la vie Parisienne.

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(Available at Fully Booked)

5. In the Country: Stories by Mia Alvar, P840
Travel around the world—and also back in time, to the ’70s and ’80s—with fellow Pinoys in nine short stories in this book, an Editor’s Choice of The New York Times. You don’t even have to be Filipino to appreciate Alvar’s finely crafted stories—stories such as those about a New-York-based pharmacist who smuggles painkillers for his dying dad back home; a Pinay teacher in Bahrain who could be the Annie Sullivan to a special-needs child’s Helen Keller; and a Filipino family in "Manilachusetts" based on the Aquinos. Alvar is truly one to watch.

(Available at Fully Booked)

6. China Rich Girlfriend: A Novel by Kevin Kwan, P798
If you’ve ever wondered how it’s like to be crazy rich, just pick up this dishy, frothy follow-up to the best-selling Crazy Rich Asians. Put yourself once more in middle-class Rachel Chu’s shoes: You’re set to marry one of Asia’s most eligible—and wealthiest—bachelors when you find out you’re the illegitimate child of a rich and powerful Chinese politician. There’s a generous helping of family drama served with heaps of wit, making those accounts of "sky’s the limit" spending easier to swallow.

(Available at Fully Booked)

7. The ABCs of Hand Lettering by Abbey Sy, P295
Want to try your hand at hand lettering? Then this is your handbook. Get to know the terms, the fonts, and the fun part: creating wonderful works of art (and heart) and sharing these with the rest of the world. Sy also helps first-timers find and fine-tune their own style. Plus, featured artists give a sneak peek of their pin-worthy portfolios for your inspiration. The ABCs is your first step to a state where you’ll "always be creating."

(Available at National Book Store)

8. Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances by Neil Gaiman, P955
"There are things in this book, as in life, that might upset you," Gaiman writes in the introduction to his third anthology of short fiction—but it makes you want to read on. There is an upside to getting upset: "They teach [you] things… and if they hurt, they hurt in ways that make [you] think and grow and change." Trigger Warning is a sophisticated hodgepodge of poetry, science fiction, fairy tales, horror, and other stories about the masks we wear "and the people we are underneath them."

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(Available at Fully Booked)

9. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins, P635
If you want more of Gone Girl, this psychological thriller can give you your fix. Rachel Watson, a jobless and divorced alcoholic, takes the same train to London every day. Along the way, she looks forward to seeing a lovely and "perfect" couple whose home is by the railroad—and then one day, the girl is gone. Rachel gets involved in the case, but her lies and muddled memories aren’t much help. You’ll want to find out how this page-turner ends in a weekend (or sooner).

(Available at National Book Store)

10. Laws for Life by Gianna Reyes Montinola and Maria Victoria Rotor-Hilado, P395
What would it be like to have your very own lawyer on speed dial? This how-to and legal reference—in an easy-to-digest Q&A format—is the next best thing. Laws for Life takes you from cradle ("How do I get an NSO copy of my birth certificate?") to grave ("Should I execute a will?") and in between ("Is it advisable to execute a pre-nuptial agreement?") in three chapters corresponding to life stages: Age of Minority, Age of Majority, and Age of Seniority. This book has you covered—for life.

(Available at National Book Store)

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