Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day SAT 26 JUL 14
Stressed from taking care of your kids? Take a short stroll in the morning to reflect and recharge.
  • Good House Keeping
    The July issue is our Makeover Special! Be inspired by the weight-loss successes of The Biggest Loser’s Kayen Lazaro and Osie Nebreja, who entered the reality TV show simply wanting to lose weight but ended up gaining whole new (healthier!) lives.
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Jumpstart your best body today with this month’s best foods special. Women’s Health shares over 100 of the best packaged foods for women, sourced from leading supermarkets, specialty stores, and delivery services.
    Women's Health
Charlene J. Owen, Contributor
 
November 22, 2012

Vitamin C Deficiency May Cause Memory Damage to Unborn Children

A new study shows that pregnant women who skip their Vitamin C supplements may harm their would-be children long after birth. By Charlene J. Owen

We all know that we shouldn't miss out on our daily Vitamin C intake, but for would-be mothers, this supplement can spell health or damage to a fetus's brain, which would stay even long after birth.

A study featured on ScienceDaily.com by the researchers of the University of Copenhagen investigated the effects of skipping Vitamin C on pregnant women and their offspring.

"Even marginal Vitamin C deficiency in the mother stunts the fetal hippocampus, the important memory center, by 10 to 15 percent, preventing the brain from optimal development,"  lead researcher Professor Jens Lykkesfeldt explains.

Scientists have initially thought that all the nutrients a baby needs can be produced by and transported from the mother, but this doesn't seem to be the case for vitamin C. That's why it's important that expectant mothers don't skip out on this important nutrient. Laboratory research further revealed a disturbing fact--vitamin C deficiency can't be remedied. Once the damage to the fetal brain has been done, any supplement taken by the baby after birth will have no effect.  

The study stresses the importance of having a healthy lifestyle, especially for pregnant women in lower social brackets. "People with low economic status who eat poorly--and perhaps who also smoke--often suffer from Vitamin C deficiency," Lykkesfeldt says. "Comparatively speaking, their children risk being born with a poorly developed memory potential. These children may encounter learning problems, and seen in a societal context, history repeats itself because these children find it more difficult to escape the environment into which they were born."  

But social status aside, it's important for expectant mothers to keep a balanced diet and maintain an ample amount of nutrients for two. Vitamin C deficiency is something that's so easy to avoid--it only needs a little discipline.

(Photo by Colin Dunn via Flickr Creative Commons)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
Why Watching TV to De-Stress May Backfire on You
You may be entertained for a while, but a new study reveals unseen negative effects.   Jul 25, 2014 
Here's Why a Little Bedtime Snack Is Good for You
Contrary to popular belief, it won't necessarily make you fat.  Jul 24, 2014 
This Is Why Alcohol and Energy Drinks Do Not Mix
Let's just say this is not the time to be adventurous.   Jul 22, 2014 
Don't Call Exercise
A new study shows that changing the way you think may help you lose weight.  Jul 18, 2014 
10 Ways to Get a Good Night’s Sleep
Look fresh-faced and stress-free when you wake up in the morning!  Jul 15, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT