Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day THU 28 AUG 14
Traveling abroad? Ditch the heels and bring comfy shoes.
  • Good House Keeping
    Forever young Cheska Garcia-Kramer talks about her stay-gorgeous secrets, mommy bliss, and the surprising success of #TeamKramer in the August issue a.k.a. the Anti-Aging Special of Good Housekeeping!
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Build the confidence to strut in a pair of jeans with our 28-day pound-shedding, lean muscle-building workout, and learn the best cuts for your body type with our easy style guide.
    Women's Health
Jennifer Chan, Staff Writer
 
February 25, 2012

Men and Women Have Different Heart Attack Symptoms, Study Shows

Research shows women are less likely to suffer from chest pains when having a heart attack. By Jennifer Chan

Many of the physiological differences between men and women have been obvious since the dawn of our existence, but some of the subtler differences are only just now coming to light. For example, there's the differences between the heart attack symptoms seen in men and women. According to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, men and women don’t necessarily produce the same symptoms for the same health problem. The discrepancy, based on the findings, has something to do with both gender and age. 

Women, for instance, were found to be less likely to complain of chest pains. In the study, only 58 percent of them reported feeling sharp stabs in their chest, compared to the 69 percent of men who did. Of the 35 percent of patients who reported feeling no chest pain, a larger percent was comprised of women. 

Women are also more likely to suffer heart attacks later in life than men. Researchers believe that this is due to their production of estrogen, which keeps plaque from forming in the heart arteries. However, this doesn’t mean that younger women are exempted from suffering heart attacks. In fact, researchers think that the heart attacks that plague younger women may be biologically different from the usual kind that affects men and older women. This makes detection of possible heart problems even more difficult.

Instead of chest pains, younger women may feel a generalized ache in different parts of the body. With more women dying of heart attacks than men, it’s important that we take note of even the slightest changes in our health. Armed with this new information, we can at least become more vigilant, watching for any symptoms before it’s too late to do anything about them. 


For more on heart attacks and heart disease, check these out:


(Photo by alexbruda via sxc.hu)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
Jennifer Chan
Staff Writer
Jennifer Chan was a contributing writer for Female Network for two years before formally joining the team as a staff writer in July 2012... Read more...
Latest Articles by This Author
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
Skip the Caffeine, This Is the Best Way to Perk Yourself Up!
We just found a better alternative to coffee.  Aug 27, 2014 
Try This Full-Body Yoga Workout at Home
Onelife Studio teaches us a workout that we can practice on our own.  Aug 19, 2014 
Rexona and Manny Pacquiao Want You to Do More
You can take free exercise classes inspired by Manny Pacquiao's routine.  Aug 14, 2014 
These 10 Factors May Affect a Woman’s Fertility
Read this before you start planning a family.   Aug 13, 2014  2
How to Lose the Last Five Pounds
Get the scale to budge, and the last inches to finally go away.  Aug 05, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT