Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day FRI 25 JUL 14
Save money while getting the rest you deserve by visiting a resort during its off season.
  • Good House Keeping
    The July issue is our Makeover Special! Be inspired by the weight-loss successes of The Biggest Loser’s Kayen Lazaro and Osie Nebreja, who entered the reality TV show simply wanting to lose weight but ended up gaining whole new (healthier!) lives.
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Jumpstart your best body today with this month’s best foods special. Women’s Health shares over 100 of the best packaged foods for women, sourced from leading supermarkets, specialty stores, and delivery services.
    Women's Health
Charlene J. Owen, Contributor
 
November 29, 2012

Laugh The Pain Off, Study Recommends

Research shows that an awesome throw-your-head-back fit of laughter can ease physical pain. By Charlene J. Owen

Apparently, a good hearty laugh is all you need to feel good and decrease pain response. It’s all about endorphins, a pain-inhibiting hormone that the body releases when exercising.

The study, conducted by evolutionary psychology professor Robin Dunbar, PhD from Oxford University, aimed to see if there is a connection between laughter in a social setting and pain response. This study was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B and posted at NBCNews.com. Scientists involved in the study ran several experiments, all within a social setting, because laughter is 30 times more likely to happen when you’re with other people than when you're alone.

The laughter measured in this study is not the polite chuckle kind of laugh, but more of the hearty or rib-tickling kind. Participants were divided into two groups: one was assigned to watch comedies ranging from episodes of South Park and Friends to Mr. Bean and The Simpsons, while the other group were made to watch documentaries on golf, pet training, or the environment. Pain-inducing activities like tightening a blood pressure cuff or placing a frozen wine cooler sleeve on the forearm were experienced by the participants before and after watching the said videos.

The researchers found out that those who watched the comedies and laughed had higher pain tolerance than those who watched the documentaries.  And it was not just because of better moods--it was the laughter itself that boosted pain tolerance.

Higher pain tolerance could help out in patients with chronic pain cope with their illness until they recovered.  Endorphins increase our body’s immune system as well, helping us fight back sickness faster.

"No doubt the pharmaceutical companies won't like it, but laughter would save on hospital bills," Professor Dunbar joked when asked if laughter is indeed the best medicine, especially for pain-related illnesses.

So keep that good sense of humor; the ability to laugh at the face of pain may just be what cures it.

(Photo by Dahl-Face Photography via Flickr Creative Commons)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
Why Watching TV to De-Stress May Backfire on You
You may be entertained for a while, but a new study reveals unseen negative effects.   Jul 25, 2014 
Here's Why a Little Bedtime Snack Is Good for You
Contrary to popular belief, it won't necessarily make you fat.  Jul 24, 2014 
This Is Why Alcohol and Energy Drinks Do Not Mix
Let's just say this is not the time to be adventurous.   Jul 22, 2014 
Don't Call Exercise
A new study shows that changing the way you think may help you lose weight.  Jul 18, 2014 
10 Ways to Get a Good Night’s Sleep
Look fresh-faced and stress-free when you wake up in the morning!  Jul 15, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT