Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day THU 31 JUL 14
Eat slowly. It's good for better digestion--it will help you enjoy your food more too!
  • Good House Keeping
    The July issue is our Makeover Special! Be inspired by the weight-loss successes of The Biggest Loser’s Kayen Lazaro and Osie Nebreja, who entered the reality TV show simply wanting to lose weight but ended up gaining whole new (healthier!) lives.
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Jumpstart your best body today with this month’s best foods special. Women’s Health shares over 100 of the best packaged foods for women, sourced from leading supermarkets, specialty stores, and delivery services.
    Women's Health
 
April 20, 2012

Kids as Young as 12 Can Also Get Sun Damage

Research shows that without proper protection, no one can escape the sun's harmful rays.

Basking under the sun for too long can be harmful—that much we already know. However, a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows that even kids as young as age 12 or 13 may be just as affected by the sun’s rays. Using a special kind of photography, researchers were able to reveal signs of sun damage not visible to the naked eye. 

In the study, researchers gathered 585 boys and girls together—all of whom were 12 or 13 years old at the start of the study. They were photographed with their eyes closed with neither sunscreen nor makeup on. Using standard, cross-polarized, and ultraviolet (UV) photography, researchers discovered signs of sun damage. UV photography, in particular, brought out previously unseen dark spots caused by the sun’s rays. 

The children also underwent a full body scan in which features like their hair color and eye color were taken note of. According to research, people who had fairer skin, blue eyes, and even red hair had a higher risk for melanoma disease.

The results appeared to be in line with what researchers expected. Those who were at high risk for melanoma had more drastic results from the UV photography as well. Researchers hope that their study can at least emphasize the importance of putting on sunscreen. Just because we can’t see any signs of sun damage, it doesn’t mean they aren’t there. 

 

(Photo by niclindh via Flickr Creative Commons)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
13 Teeth Whitening Home Remedies
Add sparkle to your pearly whites with these easy peasy solutions.  Jul 31, 2014 
Is Your Cell Phone Slowly Killing You?
It sounds like a B movie from the '90s, but Attack of the Mobile may hold more truth than fiction.   Jul 30, 2014 
Study Says It's Important for Us to Learn How to Forgive
It proves that to err is human, but to forgive is human, too.  Jul 28, 2014 
Why Watching TV to De-Stress May Backfire on You
You may be entertained for a while, but a new study reveals unseen negative effects.   Jul 25, 2014 
Here's Why a Little Bedtime Snack Is Good for You
Contrary to popular belief, it won't necessarily make you fat.  Jul 24, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT