Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day WED 30 JUL 14
Keep your brain and body active--read while on the treadmill or stationary bike. If you find it difficult, listen to an audiobook.
  • Good House Keeping
    The July issue is our Makeover Special! Be inspired by the weight-loss successes of The Biggest Loser’s Kayen Lazaro and Osie Nebreja, who entered the reality TV show simply wanting to lose weight but ended up gaining whole new (healthier!) lives.
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Jumpstart your best body today with this month’s best foods special. Women’s Health shares over 100 of the best packaged foods for women, sourced from leading supermarkets, specialty stores, and delivery services.
    Women's Health
Jennifer Chan, Staff Writer
 
April 12, 2012

Genetics May Play a Role in Our Obesity Problems

Research shows that two of our genes may be responsible for our poor eating habits. By Jennifer Chan

Have you ever wondered why some people tend to consume more fatty foods than others? According to a study published in the Journal of Food Science, the answer lies in two of our genes—the TAS2R38 and the CD36. These genes are said to affect the way we taste certain foods. While experts have already identified texture as an important component in our enjoyment of fatty foods, it is only in recent times that they have started exploring the implications of the way fat tastes in our mouths. 

Focusing their study on 300 African-American participants, researchers tried to find out whether genes really do have a say in how much fat we consume. First, they took note of the participants’ food preferences and the status of their CD36—a gene dubbed as a possible fat receptor. Based on the results, 21 percent of the volunteers appeared to have a specific genetic variant associated with preferences for added fats and oils.

Another gene—the TAS2R38—serves as a receptor of bitter compounds. According to research, 70 percent of American adults and children are tasters of the compound, while 30 percent are non-tasters. Compared to tasters, non-tasters reportedly have a harder time detecting the presence of fat in their foods because they have fewer taste buds. This then prompts them to consume more of fatty food as a result. Of course, the lack of taste buds isn’t wholly responsible for obesity. Lack of exercise and overeating in general will eventually lead to obesity.

Understanding that our genes may be making it challenging for us to taste fat in our foods may make us more aware of each bite we take. Are we consuming just the right amount of fat, or are we simply compensating for what our taste buds can’t detect?

(Photo by Kid Paparazzi via Flickr Creative Commons)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
Jennifer Chan
Staff Writer
Jennifer Chan was a contributing writer for Female Network for two years before formally joining the team as a staff writer in July 2012... Read more...
Latest Articles by This Author
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
Study Says It's Important for Us to Learn How to Forgive
It proves that to err is human, but to forgive is human, too.  Jul 28, 2014 
Why Watching TV to De-Stress May Backfire on You
You may be entertained for a while, but a new study reveals unseen negative effects.   Jul 25, 2014 
Here's Why a Little Bedtime Snack Is Good for You
Contrary to popular belief, it won't necessarily make you fat.  Jul 24, 2014 
This Is Why Alcohol and Energy Drinks Do Not Mix
Let's just say this is not the time to be adventurous.   Jul 22, 2014 
Don't Call Exercise
A new study shows that changing the way you think may help you lose weight.  Jul 18, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT