Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day THU 23 OCT 14
Accidentally get super glue on your skin while finishing a home project? Soak it in acetone and wash with soap afterward.
  • Good House Keeping
    Judy Ann Santos-Agoncillo returns to our cover this September issue and gets candid about money, marriage, and motherhood.
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Drop two sizes fast—with simple exercises you can do at home! This month's ultimate weight-loss special shows you how. Plus, real women share how you, too, can shed and keep off excess weight for good.
    Women's Health
Jennifer Chan, Staff Writer
 
May 08, 2012

Consuming a Lot of Sodium May Increase Your Risk of Having a Stroke

Research shows that high sodium can be linked to stroke. By Jennifer Chan

Most people know that a too-salty diet isn't healthy, and research offers just another reason why this is so. According to a recent study published in the journal Stroke, people who consume more than the recommended amount of salt each day may be placing themselves at risk for stroke

Researchers interviewed almost 2,700 adults on their health and diet and discovered that the participants, who were 69 years old on average at the start of the study, consumed an average of 3,031 milligrams of sodium per day. Considering that the American Heart Association’s suggested sodium intake is limited to 1,500 milligrams a day, the study participants were definitely consuming much more than was needed.

Over the next decade, 235 strokes were reported. Researchers found that those whose sodium intake peaked at 4,000 milligrams per day were three times more likely to get a stroke than those who stuck to the recommended dosage. Among the 558 participants whose sodium intake reached 4,000 milligrams, there were 66 reported strokes. Of the 320 participants who kept their sodium level under control, however, only 24 reported having experienced strokes.

Unfortunately, salt is not exactly something that is easy to avoid. However, there are ways to be smart about your food. Researchers suggest reading the labels on food packaging before you purchase them. Sticking to fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can also help you limit your sodium intake. You may also want to use a variety of spices to add flavor to your food instead of salt or condiments with high sodium levels.

 

(Photo by aschaeffer via sxc.hu)

Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
Jennifer Chan
Staff Writer
Jennifer Chan was a contributing writer for Female Network for two years before formally joining the team as a staff writer in July 2012... Read more...
Latest Articles by This Author
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
What Moderate Drinking Can Do for You + 5 Cocktails You Can Make At Home
A new study shows why a bit of booze may be good for your health.   Oct 21, 2014 
Drinking Too Much Soda May Age You, Says Study
It's time to lower your fizzy intake.  Oct 20, 2014 
Lose Weight When You Eat This Fruit Every Day
Here's how you can shed those extra pounds.   Oct 16, 2014 
Here's The Latest Detoxifying Add-On to Cold-Pressed Juices
It's neither a fruit nor a vegetable.  Oct 15, 2014 
5 Things You Should Know About Hepatitis B
Be tested. Be vaccinated. Be treated.   Oct 10, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT