Get weekly updates via email!
tip of the day FRI 22 AUG 14
Lessen the load on nature! Bring your own silverware instead of using plastic forks and spoons for lunch.
  • Good House Keeping
    Forever young Cheska Garcia-Kramer talks about her stay-gorgeous secrets, mommy bliss, and the surprising success of #TeamKramer in the August issue a.k.a. the Anti-Aging Special of Good Housekeeping!
    Good Housekeeping
  • Women's Health
    Build the confidence to strut in a pair of jeans with our 28-day pound-shedding, lean muscle-building workout, and learn the best cuts for your body type with our easy style guide.
    Women's Health
Belle Yambao, Contributor
 
September 23, 2011

New Study: Being a Supportive Mom Makes Your Kids More Commitment-Ready as Adults

Want to make sure your kids grow up fully capable of loving others? Research shows you can do this by being an encouraging mom. By Belle Yambao
supportive_mom.jpgAs a mom, you probably dream about having your kids grow up to be well-rounded, happy adults who can enter into committed relationships and be successful at a job they're passionate about. And at least one part of this formula, research shows, is something you can actively contribute to. A new study published in Psychological Science says you can trace how well individuals commit to how supportive their moms were when they were kids.

The researchers from St. Olaf College, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Illinois examined 78 young adults and their romantic partners. They looked at data from when the participants were two years old, when they performed a difficult task in the presence of their moms who had been instructed support them. They also retrieved data from when the participants were 16 and were asked to relate an argument with their best bud and how they were able to resolve it.

The results showed that individuals whose moms ignored them or laughed at them when they were two were more likely to be less committed in their relationships. The same was true for those who reported they couldn't solve their conflicts with their friends at 16.

"The takeaway for me is that early relationships set the stage for current relationships,” Minda Orina, lead author and assistant professor of psychology at St. Olaf College, is quoted as saying on TIME.com. “If people have been somewhat punitive in the past toward you or you have had relationships where there is always a winner/loser, it's less likely you will enter a romantic relationship with an attitude of trust and willingness to work through problems."

So take note, FN moms! You can build your children's self-esteem and make them more ready to face the world by guiding them through their difficulties when they're still young. This will help them develop problem-solving skills of their own and make them more accepting of love in the future.


Need more tips for raising happy children? Try these articles on FN:

(Photo by theqspeaks via Flickr Creative Commons)
Join us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
COMMENTS
Name :
Email :
Website :
Comment :
Security Image
 
 
NOTE: FemaleNetwork.com is a CLEAN ZONE. Editors reserve the right to delete obscene comments.
Filter comments by:
  • Be the first one to comment...
Filter comments by:
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
follow us
LATEST Articles
MOST READ Articles
7 Ways That Colors Make a Difference In Your Day
Here's how you can use colors to transform your mood and days!  Aug 14, 2014 
Good Housekeeping Helps One Mom Look
An updated style instantly changes this mom's image.  Aug 14, 2014  1
Feeling a bit down? Transform your life with these 8 tips, starting NOW!
Take your cue from eight inspiring real-life transformations.  Aug 07, 2014 
10 Ways To Add Color To Life
Here are simple tips to make life more interesting!  Jul 24, 2014 
G Toengi-Walters Shares How She Got Her Kids Into Math
Solving problems has never been this fun.  Jul 24, 2014 
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT